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Tara Gifts

Himalayan Trade sells a wide variety of Tara gifts including Green Tara gifts and White Tara gifts and as Green Tara statues and White Tara statues and thangkas. 

Tara is a tantric meditation deity whose practice is used by practitioners of the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner and secret teachings about compassion andemptinessTara is actually the generic name for a set of Buddhas or bodhisattvas of similar aspect. These may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as bodhisattvas are often considered metaphors for Buddhist virtues.

  • Green Tārā, (Syamatara) known as the Buddha of enlightened activity
  • White Tārā, (Sitatara) also known for compassion, long life, healing and serenity; also known as The Wish-fulfilling Wheel, or Cintachakra
  • Red Tārā, (Kurukulla) of fierce aspect associated with magnetizing all good things
  • Black Tārā, associated with power
  • Yellow Tārā, (Bhrikuti) associated with wealth and prosperity
  • Blue Tārā, associated with transmutation of anger

In Hinduism, the goddess Tara is a form of Durga.Tantric manifestations of Durga and is often depicted in similar appearance as Kali. Tara can be distinguished visually from Kali primarily via her implements. Four armed, she carries a sacrificial sword, a severed head or skull cup, a lotus and scissors. The scissor symbolizes Tara's ability to cut through unwanted habits thus freeing the individual for spiritual transcendence. Kali never holds a lotus or a pair of scissors. Tara is perceived at core as the absolute, unquenchable hunger that propels all life.

Whether the Tārā figure originated as a Buddhist or Hindu goddess is unclear and remains a source of dispute among scholars. Today, she is worshipped both in Buddhism and in Hinduism.   Tārā became a very popular Vajrayana deity with the rise of Tantra in 8th-century Pala and, with the movement of Indian Buddhism into Tibet through Padmasambhava, the worship and practices of Tārā became incorporated into Tibetan Buddhism as well. She eventually came to be considered the "Mother of all Buddhas," which usually refers to the enlightened wisdom of the Buddhas, while simultaneously echoing the ancient concept of the Mother Goddess in India.